Warren Buffett charity lunch postponed, “can’t even” about crypto.

It’s hard to imagine a lunch where the guests contrast as starkly as this pair: 88-year-old American billionaire Warren Buffett, dubbed “the Oracle of Omaha,” and 29-year-old Chinese cryptocurrency entrepreneur Justin Sun, once described by Chinese state media as “the face of China’s millennial entrepreneurs” (in Chinese).

The two will sit down together in San Francisco’s historic Jackson Square on July 25, along with seven guests chosen by Sun. They will dine at a location the crypto-entrepreneur says he selected because it “represents the traditional and the upstart—much like the participants in the lunch itself.” Sun paid $4.5 million to win the charity lunch auctioned annually by Buffett. He hopes the meal will “bridge the divide between the blockchain industry and traditional investors” and change the outlook of an investment guru who famously called cryptocurrency “rat poison squared.”

Sun Yuchen, as he’s known in China, is the fourth Chinese businessman to win the right to grab steak and hash browns with Buffett. Unlike his predecessors (in Chinese), Sun, born in 1990 into a life that has coincided with China’s three-decade economic boom, represents the “virtual economy.” The American investment guru, in contrast, has built up most of his $84 billion net worth by investing in businesses with tangible products. Tellingly, he did not invest in tech companies until he took a stake in IBM in 2011.

Sun Yuchen, as he’s known in China, is the fourth Chinese businessman to win the right to grab steak and hash browns with Buffett. Unlike his predecessors (in Chinese), Sun, born in 1990 into a life that has coincided with China’s three-decade economic boom, represents the “virtual economy.” The American investment guru, in contrast, has built up most of his $84 billion net worth by investing in businesses with tangible products. Tellingly, he did not invest in tech companies until he took a stake in IBM in 2011.

Two years after its ICO, Tronix is the 11th largest digital coin in the world by market cap ($1.5 billion)—but that rise might not convince Buffett of its worth.

“Buffett’s investment philosophy is to buy things at a price cheaper than their actual value, so they will have room to appreciate. Whereas, it’s the opposite case for ‘air coin,’” said Shen Meng, founder of Taiwan-based blockchain firm Mahamudra Technologies, using a term invoked by Chinese investors skeptical of the hype around cryptocurrency.

Despite its relative success, Tron has faced challenges, including most recently investor accusations that it failed to act against a scam project that went by a similar name to Tron’s Chinese name, Bo Chang, or Wave Field. The project vanished abruptly last month, leaving investors out some $30 million. In a statement (in Chinese) on China’s Twitter-equivalent Weibo, Sun said Tron reported the case to the police and doesn’t have any ties to the project.

Sun did not reply to questions for this story. A Tron spokesperson referred Quartz to Sun’s Weibo statement when asked about the Wave scheme, and did not reply further.

From university gadfly to blockchain poster child
Like many of his well-educated peers, Sun—who studied history at the prestigious Peking University—was drawn to liberal political ideas. That tendency deepened after a semester abroad in Hong Kong. He organized discussion groups and wrote articles criticizing government and school policies, according to the GQ profile. After the school announced a plan to tailor academic guidance to students according to various categories, such as being low-income or holding “extreme thoughts,” he wrote in a widely circulated online post, the effort was “a cruel thing that tries to institutionalize the tight control of all of PKU’s students. Am I living in Nazi Germany or a respected university?” Such posts helped him shoot to fame online and landed him on the cover of Hong Kong-based magazine Yazhou Zhoukan as a young “opinion leader” (link in Chinese).

“Some might argue that Sun became an opinion leader just to become famous, but I think it was more of a natural result of the overall social atmosphere back then in China. The figures people worshiped at that time were not rich people or entrepreneurs, but rather liberal academics or critics. This has all changed now, of course,” journalist Zhang Jieping, who interviewed Sun for the Yazhou Zhoukan cover story, told Quartz.

It was while studying for a master’s in political economy at the University of Pennsylvania in the US, Sun discovered his passion for the crypto world. He became a paper millionaire by investing early in bitcoin and on his return to Beijing in 2013, he joined Ripple Labs, the US firm that developed the Ripple payment protocol. The same year, he also founded Peiwo, a voice-based social dating app.

Soon he won an endorsement from China’s establishment. In a 2015 interview with state-owned online broadcaster CNTV, Sun said China “has the best environment for entrepreneurs in the world” (in Chinese) while the website also lauded him as “a pioneer of China’s young entrepreneurs.”

Skeptics include Vitalik Buterin
Last year, Vitalik Buterin, co-founder of the Ethereum platform, and others accused Sun of plagiarism because of similarities between the white paper explaining Tron’s purpose and those of other projects.

“Some might argue that Sun became an opinion leader just to become famous, but I think it was more of a natural result of the overall social atmosphere back then in China. The figures people worshiped at that time were not rich people or entrepreneurs, but rather liberal academics or critics. This has all changed now, of course,” journalist Zhang Jieping, who interviewed Sun for the Yazhou Zhoukan cover story, told Quartz.

It was while studying for a master’s in political economy at the University of Pennsylvania in the US, Sun discovered his passion for the crypto world. He became a paper millionaire by investing early in bitcoin and on his return to Beijing in 2013, he joined Ripple Labs, the US firm that developed the Ripple payment protocol. The same year, he also founded Peiwo, a voice-based social dating app.

Soon he won an endorsement from China’s establishment. In a 2015 interview with state-owned online broadcaster CNTV, Sun said China “has the best environment for entrepreneurs in the world” (in Chinese) while the website also lauded him as “a pioneer of China’s young entrepreneurs.”

Skeptics include Vitalik Buterin
Last year, Vitalik Buterin, co-founder of the Ethereum platform, and others accused Sun of plagiarism because of similarities between the white paper explaining Tron’s purpose and those of other projects.

Related: Warren Buffett to MBA students: This is what ‘sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack’

At 88, Warren Buffett has a lot of wisdom — and sharing it with students is one of the many wonderful things he’s known for.

One lesson the Berkshire Hathaway CEO loves to teach is the importance of developing good personal qualities at a young age.

Establishing good habits — even the little ones, like saying “please” and “thank you” — is a major key to success, he told Yahoo Finance’s editor-in-chief last year.

A high IQ won’t make you stand out
Buffett elaborated on the topic in a talk to MBA students from the University of Florida in 1998.

The legendary investor started his speech with a little game: “Think for a moment that I granted you a right — you can buy 10% of one of your classmate’s earnings for the rest of their lifetime.”

The decision should be based on merit, Buffett advised, so it’d be unwise to pick the person with the highest IQ, the richest parents or the most energy.

“There’s nothing wrong with getting the highest grades in the class, but that isn’t going to be the quality that sets apart a big winner from the rest of the pack,” said Buffett.

He continued: “You’d probably pick the person who has leadership qualities, who is able to get others to carry out their interests. That would be the person who is generous, honest and gave credit to other people for their own ideas.”

And here comes the hooker: In addition to this person, Buffett told the students they had to sell short another one of their classmates and pay 10% of what they do.

“You wouldn’t pick the person with the lowest IQ,” he said. “You’d think about the person who turned you off, the person who is egotistical, who is greedy, who cuts corners, who is slightly dishonest.”

If you see any of those qualities in yourself, you can get rid of them. “It’s simply a question of which you decide,” he said.

“If you write the good qualities down and make them habitual, you will be the one you want to buy 10% of when you’re all through, ” said Buffett. “The beauty of this is that you already own 100% of yourself, and you’re stuck with it. So you might as well be that person, that somebody else.”

Buffett said he sees people his age — or even 20 years younger — with “self-destructive behavior patterns,” and they’re entrapped by them.

Essentially, integrity — honesty, virtue and morality — can make or break you in the professional world. And if you choose not to make it a priority, you risk getting stuck with a reputation for deceit.

What Buffett looks for in a good hire
All of this goes back to what Buffett himself looks for when deciding who to hire or invest in. His decision isn’t based on business metrics, test scores or degrees. Instead, it’s all about one’s personal qualities.

“There was a guy, Pete Kiewit in Omaha, who used to say he looked for three things in hiring people: integrity, intelligence and energy,” Buffett said. “If they didn’t have the first, the other two would kill them, because if they don’t have integrity, you want them dumb and lazy.”

It makes sense — if you can’t trust someone to act with integrity in a situation that demands it, then should they really be allowed anywhere near you or your brand?

The answers seems like a resounding “no,” but it also raises another, more difficult question: How do you know who to trust?

At Berkshire Hathaway’s annual meeting in 2007, an attendee asked Buffett that exact question.

The billionaire dipped into his store of wisdom and offered this sage perspective: “People give themselves away fairly often. When someone comes to me with a business, the very things they talk about, what they regard as important — there are a lot of clues that come as to subsequent behavior.”

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